Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are stem cells?

A: The term "stem cells" includes many different kinds of cells.

What they have in common is that they have the ability to make other types of cells. No other cell in the body can do that.

Some stem cells can renew themselves and become virtually any cell in the body. Those are called pluripotent stem cells. They include embryonic stem cells.

Other stem cells don't have as much potential for self-renewal and can't make as many types of cells.

The most basic kind of stem cells are the cells that make up an embryo soon after an egg is fertilized. These stem cells divide over and over, eventually making almost all the different cells in the body.

Adult stem cells, in contrast, are "fully differentiated." That means they are what they are and do what they do. They can't choose another career.

In many organs, however, adult stem cells linger throughout life. They are part of the body's internal repair system. Researchers are still working to discover what adult stem cells from various parts of the body can and can't do. Normally, these relatively rare cells act only on the organ or tissue type in which they are found.

Recently, researchers have learned to reprogram adult cells to become pluripotent cells. These cells, called induced pluripotent cells or iPSCs, have many of the same properties as embryonic stem cells. It's not yet clear whether these cells might carry subtle DNA damage that limits their usefulness.


Q: Why use Adult Stem Cells?

A: Adult stem cells have several advantages. When they come from your own body, your immune system will not reject them. And adult stem from your own bone marrow will not contain any diseases that may transfer

Why all the excitement about stem cells?

A relatively small number of stem cells taken from your bone marrow and in our sterile laboratory we can isolate them from the rest of the cell found in bone marrow. We can then reinject this very potent stem cell solution back into your disc, facet joint or other joint with cartilage to help stimulate the development and growth of cartilage cells in those joints. until they have created millions and millions of new stem cells. This makes it possible for researchers to explore cell-based therapies.

Cell-based therapies, collectively known as regenerative medicine, hold the promise of repairing or even replacing damaged or diseased organs.

Depending on which tissues they come from, stem cells have very different properties. Those from umbilical cord blood are quite different from those from fat, for example